Looking to get that daily boost of power, energy and immunity? 

Bodybuilders Multi: An essential supplement for any athlete, designed to quickly get you hitting your goals. 

Developing new muscle and powering up your performance requires an on point nutritional plan. Getting the right minerals, vitamins and daily herbs can make a huge difference to fitness performance and lifestyle.

Don't just feel the difference, see the difference. 

- More Energy 

- Better Immunity

- Bigger Muscle Gains

- Faster Recovery


$34.00
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Why Choose
National Bodybuilding Co.
Full Cover Multi?

Our bodybuilder's multivitamin gives you a concrete basis to build your diet, leaving absolutely nothing to chance. Our complete bodybuilders multivitamin :

Provides foundational nutrition for the body and mind making you feel better day in day out.

Strengthens immunity that may be compromised from hard training or caloric deficit accelerating your ability to build muscle and perform better.

Supports anabolic processes and recovery contributing to your bodies ability to add new mass.

Promotes vitality and biological health, leaving nothing to chance nutritionally.

ESSENTIAL FOR PROGRESSION : -

Our Bodybuilder's Multi Features

Bodybuilder's Multivitamin
  • Natural & Healthy for Daily Use
  • USA Made
  • Optimized for Athletes
  • Made in cGMP Approved and FDA Registered Facilities

National Bodybuilding Co.

Who is it for?

Our National Bodybuilding Co. Multivitamin is for any athlete who wants to kick ass, regardless if that’s in the gym, in the basketball court, or in the octagon.

It provides foundational support to your daily lifestyle so you can feel and perform at your best. Three herbal blends were added to further assist with the recovery, immune system and anabolic hormones.

The Ingredients:

Vitamin A

This nutrient is one of the more silent heroes of muscle building. However, even though it’s not talked about much in the bodybuilding community, it’s incredibly important for muscle growth and maintenance. Vitamin A is involved in the repair and growth of all body tissues. And, since it’s a potent antioxidant, it protects your muscles from inflammation and oxidative stress - helping with post training recovery. [1, 2]

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is another powerful antioxidant that contributes to faster recovery times and reduced soreness after training. It not only ‘disarms’ free radicals but it is also found in high amounts in your adrenal glands which regulate energy levels, mood and hormones. [3, 4]

Vitamin D

The sunshine nutrient is one of the most powerful muscle builders. It enhances testosterone production and also makes sure that calcium from your diet goes to all the right places - mainly, your bones. Being deficient in vitamin D is no joke, and it’s not a rare occurrence either. Having too little of the nutrient can put you at risk of weak and brittle bones, slow recovery and muscle growth, and poor overall performance. [5, 6]

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is an anti-aging vitamin. Being fat-soluble, it helps reduce inflammation and oxidative stress in your muscles, but also your brain. Vitamin E is found only in small amounts in foods such as almonds and sunflower oil, which are high in fats and might not be in line with your dietary goals. Supplementing vitamin E can enhance muscle recovery significantly. [7, 8]

B Vitamins

B vitamins are basic yet essential building blocks for your body, allowing red blood cells to carry more oxygen to your muscles for optimal levels of hypertrophy. They’re also important for maintaining neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine, which govern mental well-being that is crucial for bodybuilding success. [9, 10]

Calcium

Calcium is needed not only to keep your bones strong and healthy, it also governs muscle contractions. Supplementing with it is a great idea for anyone who’s training hard and wants to optimize their ‘mind-body’ connection. [11, 12]

Magnesium

Magnesium, just like calcium, plays a role in muscle contractions. It also calms nerves and reduces anxiety. This is one of the minerals most people are deficient in. This is especially problematic for male bodybuilders because low magnesium tends to lead to low testosterone. If you’re looking to get the most out of your training sessions (aka, gain muscle faster), make sure to load up on this nutrient. [13, 14]

Zinc

Zinc is an antioxidant and trace mineral that governs numerous vital functions of your body. In the context of bodybuilding, zinc has been shown to help offset the negative effects of overtraining on male hormones - particularly, testosterone. Much like magnesium, low zinc levels can reduce your natural testosterone production, and your muscle gains with it. [15, 16]

Selenium

Selenium plays an important role in overall health, as it’s been shown to have one of the most powerful antioxidant effects of all nutrients. It disarms free radicals and the inflammation that they cause, helping you to recover from your training quicker. [17, 18]

Copper

We’ve added copper in our multivitamin formula to balance out the zinc levels, as these two minerals compete with each other for absorption. In addition, copper plays an essential role in cardiovascular health and red blood cell function. [19, 20]

Manganese

This is another trace mineral important for reducing oxidative stress and promoting muscle-building enzyme reactions. Although it’s found in foods like clams, mussels, and soybeans, supplementation is a good idea as it can boost recovery after strenuous exercise. [21, 22]

Chromium

Chromium doesn’t help with muscle building directly. Why was it included in our multivitamin formula, then? Because it balances blood sugar levels and helps promote healthy fat loss when cutting. Chromium’s effects on blood sugar levels also help you stay motivated and mentally sharp, due to how it offsets the infamous afternoon energy crash. [23, 24]

Molybdenum

Molybdenum plays a role in numerous enzymatic reactions in your body, including muscle building. This trace mineral might not get mentioned in the bodybuilding world often, but its importance for overall athletic function can’t be overstated. [25, 26]

Male Support Blend (170mg)

Consisting of powerful antioxidants Lutein and Lycopene, along with Stinging Nettle Extract and Saw Palmetto. This natural blend of ingredients is designed to boost male vitality across the board. While the antioxidants protect cells in your testes from damage, herbs such as Stinging Nettle contribute to increased testosterone levels by reducing inflammation in the body.

Immune Blend

We’ve created this blend with a simple goal; to help you stay healthy when you need it the most; aka, when cutting weight or preparing for a show. Hard training can take its toll on the body, and when coupled with a low calorie diet, your immune function can suffer. Our Immune blend makes sure that doesn’t happen - helping you to perform at your best all-year round.

Antioxidant Fruit & Energy Blend

Our Antioxidant Fruit & Energy Blend boosts daily wellness and vitality. Featuring the likes of Green tea which boosts mental focus, along with Grape Seed Extract to shorten recovery times from intense gym sessions.

Charges will appear on your statement as: National Bodybuilding LLC

References

  1. Wolff C, Musci R, Whedbee M. Vitamin supplementation and resistance exercise-induced muscle hypertrophy: shifting the redox balance scale?. J Physiol. 2015;593(14):2991-2992. doi:10.1113/JP270277
  2. Sklan D. Vitamin A in human nutrition. Prog Food Nutr Sci. 1987;11(1):39-55.
  3. Moores J. Vitamin C: a wound healing perspective. Br J Community Nurs. 2013;Suppl:S6-S11. doi:10.12968/bjcn.2013.18.sup12.s6
  4. Ellulu MS, Rahmat A, Patimah I, Khaza'ai H, Abed Y. Effect of vitamin C on inflammation and metabolic markers in hypertensive and/or diabetic obese adults: a randomized controlled trial. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2015;9:3405-3412. Published 2015 Jul 1. doi:10.2147/DDDT.S83144
  5. Mielgo-Ayuso J, Calleja-González J, Urdampilleta A, et al. Effects of Vitamin D Supplementation on Haematological Values and Muscle Recovery in Elite Male Traditional Rowers. Nutrients. 2018;10(12):1968. Published 2018 Dec 12. doi:10.3390/nu10121968
  6. Pilz S, Frisch S, Koertke H, et al. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on testosterone levels in men. Horm Metab Res. 2011;43(3):223-225. doi:10.1055/s-0030-1269854
  7. Nazrun AS, Norazlina M, Norliza M, Nirwana SI. The anti-inflammatory role of vitamin e in prevention of osteoporosis. Adv Pharmacol Sci. 2012;2012:142702. doi:10.1155/2012/142702
  8. Singh U, Devaraj S, Jialal I. Vitamin E, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Annu Rev Nutr. 2005;25:151-174. doi:10.1146/annurev.nutr.24.012003.132446
  9. Symes EK, Bender DA, Bowden JF, Coulson WF. Increased target tissue uptake of, and sensitivity to, testosterone in the vitamin B6 deficient rat. J Steroid Biochem. 1984;20(5):1089-1093. doi:10.1016/0022-4731(84)90348-0
  10. Ford TC, Downey LA, Simpson T, McPhee G, Oliver C, Stough C. The Effect of a High-Dose Vitamin B Multivitamin Supplement on the Relationship between Brain Metabolism and Blood Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress: A Randomized Control Trial. Nutrients. 2018;10(12):1860. Published 2018 Dec 1. doi:10.3390/nu10121860
  11. Szent-Györgyi AG. Calcium regulation of muscle contraction. Biophys J. 1975;15(7):707-723. doi:10.1016/S0006-3495(75)85849-8
  12. Khazai N, Judd SE, Tangpricha V. Calcium and vitamin D: skeletal and extraskeletal health. Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2008;10(2):110-117. doi:10.1007/s11926-008-0020-y
  13. Potter JD, Robertson SP, Johnson JD. Magnesium and the regulation of muscle contraction. Fed Proc. 1981;40(12):2653-2656.
  14. Boyle NB, Lawton C, Dye L. The Effects of Magnesium Supplementation on Subjective Anxiety and Stress-A Systematic Review. Nutrients. 2017;9(5):429. Published 2017 Apr 26. doi:10.3390/nu9050429
  15. Kilic M, Baltaci AK, Gunay M, Gökbel H, Okudan N, Cicioglu I. The effect of exhaustion exercise on thyroid hormones and testosterone levels of elite athletes receiving oral zinc. Neuro Endocrinol Lett. 2006;27(1-2):247-252.
  16. Friis H, Ndhlovu P, Mduluza T, et al. The impact of zinc supplementation on growth and body composition: a randomized, controlled trial among rural Zimbabwean schoolchildren. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997;51(1):38-45. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1600358
  17. Huang Z, Rose AH, Hoffmann PR. The role of selenium in inflammation and immunity: from molecular mechanisms to therapeutic opportunities. Antioxid Redox Signal. 2012;16(7):705-743. doi:10.1089/ars.2011.4145
  18. Rederstorff M, Krol A, Lescure A. Understanding the importance of selenium and selenoproteins in muscle function. Cell Mol Life Sci. 2006;63(1):52-59. doi:10.1007/s00018-005-5313-y
  19. Alissa EM, Bahijri SM, Lamb DJ, Ferns GA. The effects of coadministration of dietary copper and zinc supplements on atherosclerosis, antioxidant enzymes and indices of lipid peroxidation in the cholesterol-fed rabbit. Int J Exp Pathol. 2004;85(5):265-275. doi:10.1111/j.0959-9673.2004.00392.x
  20. National Research Council (US) Committee on Copper in Drinking Water. Copper in Drinking Water. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 2000. 3, Health Effects of Copper Deficiencies.
  21. Li L, Yang X. The Essential Element Manganese, Oxidative Stress, and Metabolic Diseases: Links and Interactions. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2018;2018:7580707. Published 2018 Apr 5. doi:10.1155/2018/7580707
  22. Avila DS, Puntel RL, Aschner M. Manganese in health and disease. Met Ions Life Sci. 2013;13:199-227. doi:10.1007/978-94-007-7500-8_7
  23. A scientific review: the role of chromium in insulin resistance. Diabetes Educ. 2004;Suppl:2-14.
  24. Rabinovitz H, Friedensohn A, Leibovitz A, Gabay G, Rocas C, Habot B. Effect of chromium supplementation on blood glucose and lipid levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus elderly patients. Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2004;74(3):178-182. doi:10.1024/0300-9831.74.3.178
  25. Mendel RR. The molybdenum cofactor. J Biol Chem. 2013;288(19):13165-13172. doi:10.1074/jbc.R113.455311
  26. Bourke CA. Molybdenum Deficiency Produces Motor Nervous Effects That Are Consistent with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Front Neurol. 2016;7:28. Published 2016 Mar 8. doi:10.3389/fneur.2016.00028